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Don’t worry, be happy

The smiley face is popular around the world for representation of a happy face. Its design shows a yellow circle with two black dots that represent eyes, and a black arc for the mouth. The emoji is popular across the internet and other digital platforms. Unknown to many, the smiley face was designed by an artist employed by an insurance company. In addition, it has contributed to the death of the emoticon, and due to its popularity, the emoji is widely represented in films and media across the world.

The true origin of the smiley face

The true origin of the smiley face is a creation of Harvey Ross, there’s no doubt of that. However- over the years, other artists produced their own versions across different parts of the world. You might think there is some global plan that is making a simple smile part of the so-called ‘end game’. Is the Smiley really linked to the Apocalypse is quite thought provoking and nearly obscene in context, yet we do our best to give an exact timeline as to where this iconic face has originated from.

Movies and media with Smiley

You can’t be famous and nobody knows who you are. Smiley is known for a lot of media coverage and the idea behind it started as far back as the second World War and was even revived full swing by the near-end of the Vietnam War! A prophecy of sorts- that subtle image seen withing the light of the Sankara Stone from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, or was it on the cover poster of: “Miracle Mile”. We may never know the real truth, which is what this section aims to resolve once and for all.

The overused Emoji

There is a certain abuse going on here. The emoji is popular across the internet, and with mobile text messaging services, as millions of people use it without paying much attention to the bigger picture. Undoubtedly, the emoji by far is so overly used because most people apply it in the wrong context. Nowadays- people randomly use the emoji without its intended purpose, but some think it’s used to laugh hard at something when you come across a hilarious topic. Anytime the conversation turns comical people assume that they should use this emoji -yet its a must for nearly any emotional response. See how much is truth and what is rumor.

A lost art- the death of Emoticon

The discovery of the emoji spearheaded the death of the emoticon. An emoji is an advanced form of expression that resulted from the advent of technology. Nowadays, people express themselves rarely with the emoticon as emoji has taken over and available across many digital platforms. But how much of that is really the truth? Is there a chance the Emoticon will have a twist return? Do you like emoji games? Check out this new exciting Planet Emoji game on SlotsFree.com. The game can be played for free in your browser with no download.

Why does media and film love the smiley so much?

Why does media and film love the smiley so much?
This ball of joy- literally- was sketched first by an American artist Harvey Ross Ball (his last name, some would say is ironic). He made the drawing for an insurance company in Massachusetts- the State Mutual Life Assurance Company. He completed the drawing in 10 minutes and was paid $45 for his ingeniously deceptive art which embodied minimalism. The drawing wasn't trademarked by its creator or the company. Like anything which is a part of culture, this emoticon was further made popular with its surprisingly widespread use and portrayal.

The True Origin Of The Smiley Face

The True Origin Of The Smiley Face
The Smiley Face is just two black dots over a smile on a yellow background, but has become ubiquitous over social media and electronic communication. Ever wonder where it started? Let's look at the birth of this happy example of modern culture, and maybe realize it's not as contemporary as we thought. Jan Ladislaides, a legal officer to the town of Trencin, Slovakia, wrote the first documented use of what would now be called a happy emoticon, in 1635, next to his signature, certifying the authenticity of the town accounts.

The Overused Emoje

The Overused Emoje
There was a time when the emoje was just the kind of thing that teenagers used in their instant messenger conversations, but today they are everywhere. Even executives sometimes use them in their work emails. If popular culture is to be believed, everyone loves the emoje. There is even "Emoji: The Movie", and a whole line of merchandise available. That is if you haven’t gotten tired of the current trend of ‘everything unicorn’. So it’s no secret that a lot of people secretly hate the emoji, and cringe when they see them. Yet they may even be tempted to use them in conversation themselves.

A lost art- the death of Emoticon

A lost art- the death of Emoticon
If you were messaging in the 80’s or even in the past decade, then you are familiar with the old school emoticons used to deliver a joke or not, in a standard text form message. Some people might refer to this style as being ‘old school’ but to some of us, they are technically inferior to the modern millennial. The Emoticons were and still can be used to add a little visual effect to any written text message. However, the invention of the more conventional emoji icons became more famous with a growing millennial population and has had a significant impact on their usage.